Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
urban plight of the american city by giving the banks to lend and that integrate them into the financial system. very small at the stage. the kennedy reinvestment act is fairly kosher and terms of the way in which it's making those loans. by the 1990's, there is an explosion of mortgage debt and to black communities, enormous pride that the world is trying to buy secondary mortgages. the treasury proudly says so. and then every shares turned to business. the congressional inquiry and the crisis shows that 10,000 people in florida who were selling mortgages and florida have the conviction. for thousands of those. now, there were cards in the wheel compared to the giant financial institutions or running them. but it was that integration into the financial system which is part of the question you asked about unions. but it is only unions. in a sense, you know, we need to understand a very volatile time. >> we might want to open up to the audience. >> hi. i am with the union. talk about a systematic change. that they do. [inaudible] how would that happen politically? they don't call the pres
inskeep, co-host of morning edition on npr and the author of this book, his first book, "instant city: life and death in catchy." karachi." steve inskeep, what happened in karachi on december 20, 2000? >> i'll let you and thanks by the way for the invitation and what for you guys are doing. on december 20, 2009 there was a religious procession in the middle of this gigantic mega- city, one of the rapidly growing megacities in the world that was bomb. it's a tragic story but when you begin digging into the details of that single day, peeling back the layers, what i discovered was the star that to me a loom and it's the way the world is developing, the way the world is going. the way that different kinds of people are coming together in cities, sometimes quite violently, and thrashing out our future. this is an event i learned about that became this book. now, how many people were killed, who bombed to? >> about three dozen people. saying precisely who bombed who is challenging, but in the end it turned out to be am at least according to the authorities, a militant group which is why ma
. >> there's $750 billion of waste in health care annually. bruce brussard recently spoke to the city club of cleveland about health care, insurance, and medicare. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, welcome to the city club of cleveland. i'm president of the city club's burped of directors. i'm delighted to introduce to you the president and effective january 1, ceo, of humana inc, a phenomenonture 100 health care and health insurance provider and administrator serving over 11 million customers in the united states. over the recent election, at the center of the policy debate with implications beyond the health care industry impacting the largest fiscal pom aand larger concerns. fortunate to have with us him here to share insights on the industry and the developing policy. prior to joining humana in 2011, he was an executive, and before that, u.s. oncology, large producers and providers of health care products to to major health care institutions. with that background, he brings to the podium today a broad perspective on health care issues facing the country. he holds the undergraduate de
in the next congress and it is very important. let me say whether we abuilding high-speed rail, inner-city passenger rail, transit services, any kind of infrastructure highways you would not want to build the four lane highway where there are no passengers or vehicles with access that you would not want to build a city transit system where you don't have adequate capacity and passengers to use that facility, the same thing holds true anymore with passenger service. when i heard president obama and this administration, beginning to promote high speed rail, unfortunately most of the money, the $10 billion, does not go for high-speed rail. they chose instead to support almost 150 projects and that number is growing and a lot of that money has been left behind. in fact, most of the money that has been read dedicated to high speed rail has been sent back by states including my state, the state of florida, we had to switch a proposal for high-speed rail, the actual speed was 84 miles an hour. 84 miles for one hour transit the distance of the proposed link in central florida, that is not high spe
so it is okay to run the power line through the state parks to get them to the city's whereas before this he couldn't even look at a state park was the idea of running power lines through it. without i'm going to turn this over to alex that will step us through the fallacies and the rise of the entire scientific left and we have time for q&a afterwards because i'm going to reach behind alex and popped him with a book if it runs too late. over to you and thanks for doing this. >> thanks for that kind introduction. so, i -- our book is "science left behind" and it's about the feel-good fallacies of their diet and the antiscientist left and as he said my name is alex and i got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington, and more importantly now the editor of nuclear science.com. so, just a little bit about my background entirely microbiology. in fact that's me. a friend of mine had become an ob/gyn so i look like a geek in that picture so i put there. that's me working in the chamber which you may have come across at one point. uigur left with extremely slowly bacteria. i went to the univ
, well villager compound in kendu bay, probably an hour and a half from the city of consumer -- kisumu. it now had a cement floor but we were told would obama's slept they are there was no cement, just rolled much. and he spent two nights there. when he was visiting that area, that part of the obama clan on his journey through africa, his first ever trip there. just to think, it's not like, it has nothing to do with how i feel about obama. and really, i don't approach the book that way anywhere. is just the main character of my book. and has nothing to do what i like him or dislike him. it has to do with the history of seeing this little place, before anybody, anybody knew who the hell barack obama was. you know, he was 26 years old, making that first journey back to a land that he had never seen before. and i was looking at this little hut on the floor where he slept of those nights back in 1987, and just kind of come it didn't overwhelm the but it made me realize that, to see history as so much more powerful than just sort of think about it or read about it. i mean, i'll be able to p
at columbia. his first night in new york city -- where did he spend a? >> guest: is very dubious about this in my book, but he -- he couldn't get into his apartment. he couldn't get the key of the sublet of the front of his mother's. so he slept outside of his suitcase. he said he had called and came over there the next morning. >> host: genevieve makes the scene in new york city. who is that? >> guest: genevieve cook is an australian who's mother had a second marriage to a notable american, so the family kind of had american ties. she came to new york city and met barack obama after he graduated columbia. they had a lot in common from the moment they met. they both had indonesian connections. the father and mother had lived in indonesia. he was a diplomat. and so she had lived there. her family was in the upper crust. and so she and barry both have this connection -- the indonesian connections as well. [inaudible] a fabulous researcher at "the washington post" and gabriel banks. eventually i found her and i can tell all that story because not because of the book but because of she had
. first san francisco and then in a little town called redwood city, a few miles from stanford--i would claim that as my childhood home. c-span: and where did you get your undergraduate degree? >> guest: spelman college in atlanta and... c-span: in what subject? >> guest: in political science. and my master's and phd from harvard. c-span: and where are you getting your interest in political science along the way? where did it come from? >> guest: probably having parents that were civil rights activists in the '60s in the bay area. that was probably my initial interest. i saw their activism, and that was important. but also, i think i became interested in international affairs at spelman, in particular for s--from some courses that i took, and then harvard was a wonderful place to study international relations. the end of the cold war story became important to me later on in my graduate career when i took a job, to the dismay of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a
across the surface of the world in 80 days though you can fly around in our city can afford the ticket and get the password and the visas. when i returned from sea, back on land, i looks for histories around the world travel. there was none so i wrote one. now, i very quickly decided early on in the project that there was no point in trying to document all of the circumnavigation's that existed. i didn't want to write an encyclopedia. i wanted to explain why circumnavigation is distinctidistincti ve, why do we have the term around the world or circumnavigation? what do these mean? white is going around the world matter in a the broader scheme of things? it shows how human beings have been thinking for themselves on a planetary scale for a long time for nearly 500 years. this is really significant. we think a planetary consciousness is recent, something developed in modern times, something we have the people in the past didn't and we especially associate this realization of things on a planetary scale with their ongoing environmental crisis which we think of as unprecedented. but the pl
cities and on our coasts and, you know, brought me right back to square one in terms of piquing my curiosity about how all these systems fit together. not just the internet, but power and aviation and all these large, incredibly complicated things that we depend on so much. >> host: "tubes" is the name of the book, "a journey to the center of the internet," and andrew blum is the author. this is "the communicators" on c-span. >> with a month left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-end lists of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction selections. these nonfiction titles were included in the los angeles public library's best of 2012. salman rushdie recounts his years in hiding following a fatwa issued in 1989 for mr. rushdie's authorship of the novel, "the satanic verses." in "roger williams and the creation of the american soul: church, state and the birth of liberty," john barry recounts the life of the theologian and his thoughts on the division of religion and politics. former secretary of state madeleine albright re
i just laid out but, you know, elder -- an elder told me one time in urban cities you walk out the door, you go down the street to safeway for your food. in rural alaska, you open your door, what's in front of you, the nature that they see, is the grocery store. so when they have in our case the y.k. delta in the western part of alaska had devastating king salmon fishery loss in the sense of the qawpt of fish. when that fish is not able to be harvested to be put in the storehouses for the winter, the limited cash that they have in an area where fuel costs to heat their home are $8, $9, $12 a gallon, now have to go to not only heating they've set aside that cash for, now they have to get food shipped in. so their limited cash is now split between heating their home and putting food on the table. in fairbanks, alaska, which is urban, but outside, 40 below yesterday. so heating the home is not just like turning your heater on after work. it's a whole different ballgame. but they live off the land. it is not some hobby on the weekend, not a sports event. it's where they harvest the
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11